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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

One daily Combo Pill helps Lower Heart Disease Risk in study of underserved patients

October 19, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the New England Journal of Medicine and funded by the American Heart Association, the leading voluntary health organization devoted to a world of longer, healthier lives, taking one daily pill that combined medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol lowered heart disease risk among underserved patients better than taking several separate medications to treat these risk factors.

A polypill that delivers several medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol in a single daily capsule appears to lower heart disease risk more than traditional care. (American Heart Association)

A polypill that delivers several medications to treat high blood pressure and high cholesterol in a single daily capsule appears to lower heart disease risk more than traditional care. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sleeping less than Six Hours and Heart Disease, Stroke – Deadly Combo

October 18, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association, middle-aged adults with high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke could be at high risk for cancer and early death when sleeping less than six hours per day.

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

Bar graph showing that for people who slept less than 6 hours, the risk of early death associated with hypertension or diabetes was two times higher, while the risk of early death associated with heart disease or stroke was three times higher. (Fernandez-Mendoza et al; Journal of the American Heart Association)

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Arm cuff blood pressure measurements may fall short for predicting heart disease risk in some people with resistant high blood pressure

October 6, 2019

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – A measurement of central blood pressure in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure could help reduce risk of heart disease better than traditional arm cuff readings for some patients, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

Central blood pressure, also called blood pressure amplification, is measured at the aorta, the artery closest to the heart.

Reducing heart disease risk in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure involves more than controlling blood pressure based on arm cuff measurements. (American Heart Association)

Reducing heart disease risk in people with difficult-to-treat high blood pressure involves more than controlling blood pressure based on arm cuff measurements. (American Heart Association)

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High Blood Pressure affects Young, Healthy Medical Students

September 30, 2019

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Almost two-thirds of medical students had above-normal blood pressure and were more than twice as likely to experience clinically high blood pressure compared to the general public, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions.  

High blood pressure is typically linked with older age, being overweight, smoking and/or being in general poor health.

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

Young male medical students were 13 times more likely to develop elevated blood pressure than their female counterparts. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Plaque in Arteries may not all be the same

June 6, 2019

American Heart AssociationBoston, MA – According to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in new and emerging scientific research in arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, vascular biology, peripheral vascular disease, vascular surgery and functional genomics, a specific type of immune cell is more commonly found in arterial plaque from patients suffering from a recent stroke or mini-stroke.

Not all plaque is alike; researchers have found that a specific type of immune cell is more common in arterial plaque that is likely to cause a stroke or mini-stroke. (American Heart Association)

Not all plaque is alike; researchers have found that a specific type of immune cell is more common in arterial plaque that is likely to cause a stroke or mini-stroke. (American Heart Association)

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Arsenic in drinking water may change heart structure

June 4, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging, an American Heart Association journal drinking water that is contaminated with arsenic may lead to thickening of the heart’s main pumping chamber in young adults, a structural change that increases the risk for future heart problems.

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

Among young adults, drinking water contaminated with arsenic may lead to structural changes in the heart that raise their risk of heart disease. (American Heart Association)

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Prolonged exposure to Low-Dose Radiation may increase the risk of Hypertension

June 2, 2019

Hypertension is a known cause of Heart Disease and Stroke

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a study of workers at a nuclear plant in Russia published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension, prolonged exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation increased the risk of hypertension

Uncontrolled hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, can to lead to heart attack, stroke, heart failure and other serious health problems.

This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. (American Heart Association)

This study is the first to associate an increased risk of hypertension to low doses of ionizing radiation among a large group of workers who were chronically exposed over many years. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says New Pediatric Blood Pressure guidelines identify more Kids at higher risk of Premature Heart Disease

May 24, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension new guidelines that classified more children as having elevated blood pressure  are better at predicting which kids are likely to develop heart disease when they reach adulthood.

The guidelines were issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in 2017 and endorsed by the American Heart Association.

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Children who were reclassified as having elevated blood pressure under new American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines are more likely to develop high blood pressure, thickening of the heart muscle and other conditions that increase heart disease risk when they reach adulthood, compared with children who have normal blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American College of Cardiology / American Heart Association Guidance for Preventing Heart Disease, Stroke

April 23, 2019

American Heart Association 

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – The choices we make every day can have a lasting effect on our heart and vascular health. Adopting a heart healthy eating plan, getting more exercise, avoiding tobacco and managing known risk factors are among the key recommendations in the 2019 Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease guideline from the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA). Also, it is recommended that aspirin should only rarely be used to help prevent heart attacks and stroke in people without known cardiovascular disease.

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

4 chambers of the heart: right atrium, right ventricle, left atrium, left ventricle. (American Heart Association)

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Yo-yo dieting may increase women’s heart disease risk

April 10, 2019

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – Yo-yo dieting may make it harder for women to control a variety of heart disease risk factors, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2019, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population-based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Women who have lost at least 10 pounds, only to regain the weight within a year, are more likely to have a poor score on the American Heart Association’s - Life’s Simple 7, a measure of how well people control important heart disease risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Women who have lost at least 10 pounds, only to regain the weight within a year, are more likely to have a poor score on the American Heart Association’s – Life’s Simple 7, a measure of how well people control important heart disease risk factors. (American Heart Association)

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