Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes
Home - Set as Homepage - Add to Favorites - Contact Us
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee Photo Gallery and Video Gallery
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes Tuesday - October 20, 2020  
Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus


 
Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Under President Donald Trump’s Leadership, U.S. Economy Will Come Back Strong

June 19, 2020

The White HouseWashington, D.C. – “As the economy gets back to where it was, with record low unemployment for African Americans, Hispanics, women and the disabled, and with more rapid increases in non-supervisory pay, Americans deserve to be hopeful and eager to get back to their pre-pandemic routines,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross writes in The Kansas City Star.
 
“While we focus on improving the economic growth of our nation, all Americans from coast to coast will be able to enjoy the economic benefits of which the United States of America is capable.”

The White House - West Wing. (Official White House Photo) [Read more]

American Heart Association reports Cannabis may be linked to Strokes, Heart Rhythm disturbances in Young People

November 12, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Frequent cannabis (marijuana) use among young people was linked to an increased risk of stroke and people diagnosed with cannabis use disorder were more likely to be hospitalized for heart rhythm disturbances (arrhythmias), according to two new preliminary studies to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 — November 16th -18th in Philadelphia.

Young people who reported using cannabis frequently had higher risk of having a stroke, according to a Virginia study. (American Heart Association)

Young people who reported using cannabis frequently had higher risk of having a stroke, according to a Virginia study. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Racial inequities uncovered in hospital admissions for Heart Failure

October 30, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure, people who are Black or of Latin American descent with heart failure are less likely to be admitted to specialized cardiology units, a disparity that may help explain long-known racial differences in heart failure outcomes.

Heart failure patients not treated in a specialized cardiac care unit are more likely to be readmitted within one month of discharge. (Rupal O’Quinn, University of Pennsylvania)

Heart failure patients not treated in a specialized cardiac care unit are more likely to be readmitted within one month of discharge. (Rupal O’Quinn, University of Pennsylvania)

[Read more]

High Levels of Chronic Stress linked to High Blood Pressure in African Americans

October 24, 2019

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the open access journal of the American Heart Association, African Americans reporting high levels of chronic stress tended to develop high blood pressure, or hypertension, more often than those who reported low stress levels.

Woman Blood Pressure check with Nurse. (American Heart Association)

Woman Blood Pressure check with Nurse. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Fluctuating Personal Income may be associated with an Increased Heart Disease Risk

January 12, 2019

American Heart Association – Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Sudden, unpredictable drops in personal income during young adulthood are associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease and/or dying from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States, the recent rise in income inequality suggests that a larger proportion of the population faces poverty and economic difficulties. In addition, while most people experience some income change, income volatility has been on the rise and has reached a record high level since 1980.

Young adults who had two or more significant drops in income over a 15-year period had nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or dying prematurely. (American Heart Association)

Young adults who had two or more significant drops in income over a 15-year period had nearly double the risk of cardiovascular disease or dying prematurely. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Dangerous Blood Pressure Spikes among Blacks happen five times more often than average

October 23, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – Black adults experience dangerous spikes in high blood pressure, called a hypertensive crisis, at a rate that is five times the national average, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association’s Joint Hypertension 2018 Scientific Sessions, an annual conference focused on recent advances in hypertension research.

Blacks with high blood pressure experience hypertensive crisis, a life-threatening condition where blood pressure surges severely and quickly, at a rate five times the national average. (American Heart Association)

Blacks with high blood pressure experience hypertensive crisis, a life-threatening condition where blood pressure surges severely and quickly, at a rate five times the national average. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Most Black Adults have High Blood Pressure before age 55

July 19, 2018

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Approximately 75 percent of black and men women are likely to develop high blood pressure by the age of 55, compared to 55 percent of white men and 40 percent of white women in the same age range, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

Man checking blood pressure at office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Black teens from Great Recession may have higher risk factors for heart disease, diabetes

September 20, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers studied 328 African-Americans who had experienced the Great Recession of 2007-2009 as 16- and 17-year-olds living in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Low-income patients more likely to take blood pressure medication when doctor involves them in conversation

August 29, 2017

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

June 27, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Next Page »

 
|Home|Articles|Movie Theatre|Photo Gallery|Weather|Contact Us|
 
 
©2008 Discover Paris TN, Paris TN Web Design and Hosting by Compu-Net Enterprises.