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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

About: Sue Freeman Culverhouse



    Sue Freeman Culverhouse has been a freelance writer for the past 33 years. Beginning in 1976, she published magazines articles in Americana, Historic Preservation, American Horticulturist, Flower and Garden, The Albemarle Magazine, and many others. Sue is the winner of two Virginia Press Awards in writing.

    She moved to Springfield, Tennessee in 2003 with her sculptor husband, Bill a retired attorney. Sue has one daughter,  Susan Leigh Miller who teaches poetry and creative writing at Rutgers University.

    Sue teaches music and writing at Watauga Elementary School in Ridgetop, Tennessee to approximately 500 students in kindergarten through fifth grade. She also publishes a literary magazine each year; all work in the magazine is written and illustrated by the students.

    Sue writes "Uncommon Sense," a column in the Robertson County Times, which also appears on Clarksville Online. She is the author of "Seven keys to a sucessful life", which is  available on amazon.com and pubishamerica.com; this is a self-help book for all ages.

    Web Site: http://culverhouseart.com/
    Email: cuverhouse@comcast.net

 

Sue Freeman Culverhouse's Articles:

    Origins of the Christmas Carol “Silent Night”

    By | December 24, 2020 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    ChristmasClarksville, TN – “Silent Night” is one of the  best loved Christmas carols of all time”. In my humble opinion, somehow the simple words convey the mystery and simplicity of the real Christmas story better than any other hymn.

    The original carol was entitled, Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht; it was written in German at the request of an Austrian priest, Father Josef Mohr.

    According to www.silentnight.web.za, “on December 24th, 1818, Joseph Mohr journeyed to the home of musician-schoolteacher Franz Gruber who lived in nearby Arnsdorf. He showed his friend the poem he had written four years before and asked him to add a melody and guitar accompaniment so that it could be sung at Midnight Mass.”

    Silent Night

    Silent Night

    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    “Silent Night” Christmas Carol, Origins

    By | December 25, 2019 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    ChristmasClarksville, TN – On of the best-loved Christmas carol of all time is “Silent Night”. In my humble opinion, somehow the simple words convey the mystery and simplicity of the real Christmas story better than any other hymn.

    The original carol was entitled, Stille Nacht, heilige Nacht; it was written in German at the request of an Austrian priest, Father Josef Mohr.

    According to www.silentnight.web.za, “on December 24th, 1818, Joseph Mohr journeyed to the home of musician-schoolteacher Franz Gruber who lived in nearby Arnsdorf. He showed his friend the poem he had written four years before and asked him to add a melody and guitar accompaniment so that it could be sung at Midnight Mass.”

    Silent Night

    Silent Night

    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Book Review: Blood River to Berlin by Michael Freeland

    By | July 3, 2016 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – With Independence Day approaching, if you can read only one book this year, let it be Blood River to Berlin. No, you aren’t going to find it on the best seller list available from a New York publisher. This book is written by your neighbor, Michael Freeland, who lives in Hopkinsville, KY.

    Published by Proctor’s Hall Press in Sewanee, Tennessee, Blood River to Berlin: The World War II Journal of an Army Medic is the story of someone who started to school in a one-room schoolhouse in a remote community called “Blood River” in Henry County, Tennessee. He dropped out of high school, went to Detroit to work, and was drafted into the United States Army.

    Blood River to Berlin

    Blood River to Berlin

    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society

    By | February 24, 2015 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – Once in a while when you’re in a second-hand store, you can run across a book you’ve missed when it first came out, but one that becomes a lifelong favorite. That’s what happened to me when I found “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows (The Dial Press, August, 2008).

    Who could resist a book with a title like this!

    The entire book is a series of letters with the central character a writer named Juliet Ashton. The initial setting is just after World War II as Juliet is setting out on a book tour for her collection of columns she wrote during the war to help keep up spirits of those at home in England.

    The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Mystery Writers You Should Know: Georges Simenon

    By | October 26, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     
    Georges Simenon

    Author Georges Simenon

    Georges Simenon is quoted in THE WRITER’s QUOTATION BOOK by James Charlton, Editor, on page 52, as saying, “Writing is not a profession but a vocation of unhappiness.”

    In case you are not already acquainted with this phenomenal author, you are in for a treat. The “facts” following have been gleaned from various internet sources and are not guaranteed to be totally accurate since writers have numerous ideas about his life. Read with a grain of salt!

    Georges Simenon was Belgian, but he wrote all his books in French. His creation, Inspector Jules Maigret, is second only to Sherlock Holmes as the world’s most well-known detective. «Read the rest of this article»

     

    The Surprising Saga of Sporting Suspenders

    By | July 27, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     
    John Lithgow sporting suspenders

    John Lithgow sporting suspenders

    At some point in the life of some older men, a shift occurs. The former rounded derriere becomes flattened and the formerly flat abdomen becomes a rounded tummy. This can occur because of lessened activity due to illness of some variety, a hernia that can happen to the central muscles of a man’s chest, or simply the advent of becoming a “couch potato” for a number of years. It can even happen when someone has indulged in too many trips to the beer keg or drinks cabinet. (Or, as someone has put it, he might have traded one “six pack” set of muscles for too many others in cans or bottles!)

    The result of this shift to “no hips” and “more tummy than one wishes” may necessitate moving from the use of a belt to hold up one’s pants to the purchase of suspenders.
    «Read the rest of this article»

     

    If, in a Moment of Insanity, I Should Dye

    By | July 19, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    Dye Your Own HairTwo people in this lifetime you should never keep waiting are your attorney and your hairdresser. Without a doubt, you never ever want to get your hairdresser mad at you. (Think hair cut from the Underworld or hair style like a rock star!)

    If you are–like me–totally incompetent at styling your own hair, you realize that your hairdresser is your best friend. (Hopefully, you rarely need the services of your lawyer except to draw up your will and assist with the purchase of your house so we’ll now proceed to the important area of your hair color!)

    At any rate, in the olden days when I was delusional to the point that I believed I could dye my own hair, I actually tried it on several occasions. Born with mousey brown hair, I have had my hair frosted, auburn, blonde and once, mistakenly black! «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Wishful Thinking for School Children for the Coming Year

    By | July 12, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    School LunchI saw an ad that described a huge giveaway of thousands of dollars for the person who wins and another equal amount for the charity the person chose to write about. It started my thinking about what would be an ideal situation for the children who will soon be starting back to school.

    The first thing I would wish for them is that each and every child would have a good breakfast every morning (and adequate food for the entire day, of course!). According to the Child Nutrition Fact Sheet, missing breakfast and experiencing hunger can impair a child’s ability to learn. Quite a number of studies have linked hunger with lessened recall and poor math skills. Regardless of any studies, it just makes common sense that a child who is hungry is not as focused on learning. «Read the rest of this article»

     

    How to Overcome Comforting Yourself with Comfort Foods

    By | June 28, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     
    Comfort Foods (Tim Hawk, NJ.com)

    Comfort Foods (Tim Hawk, NJ.com)

    Comfort foods have become a way of life these days. It’s not hard to understand why we need comfort foods. Our lives are full of stress. The crashing economy has scared most intelligent people silly. The thought that what we formerly believed was enough money to live on has now become barely adequate is enough to send anyone running to the ice cream carton or the macaroni and cheese bowl or the potato chip bag.

    We seek comfort when we are stressed. We learned as babies that milk was comfort. When we were sick as children, we were comforted by chicken soup or ice cream or whatever Mom’s favorite cookie recipe was. We continued as teens to comfort our growing insecurity about our popularity with cheeseburgers, soft drinks and doughnuts. We entered college and survived on pizzas to overcome exam jitters. «Read the rest of this article»

     

    Fun Ways for Kids to Learn during Summer Vacation

    By | June 14, 2010 | Email This Post Print This Post
     

    According to research by Harris Cooper of Duke University, the average student loses at least a month’s worth of learning over the summer. Math skills are supposed to take a greater hit than other subjects. What can you do to help your child avoid the slippery slope?

    First, make every day a learning experience. If appropriate, have your child take classes in summer school or go to vacation Bible school. In addition, everyday activities can teach many things to children. «Read the rest of this article»

     
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