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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Obesity in Young Women may set the stage for Heart Complications during and after Pregnancy

August 17, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Antonio, TX – Even in young women, obesity may potentially lead to heart complications during and after pregnancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in basic cardiovascular science.  

Obesity is a risk factor for preeclampsia, a type of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy and leaves women more prone to high blood pressure and heart disease later in life.  

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stroke survivors could gain the most from new Blood Pressure Guidelines

June 28, 2018

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treating high blood pressure in stroke survivors more aggressively, could cut deaths by one-third, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The potential to reduce mortality and recurrent stroke is immense, because more than half of all strokes are attributable to uncontrolled high blood pressure,” said Alain Lekoubou, M.D., M.S., study lead author and clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

The brain has about 100 billion cells called neurons. It’s made up of distinct parts, that developed though human evolution. (American Heart Association)

The brain has about 100 billion cells called neurons. It’s made up of distinct parts, that developed though human evolution. (American Heart Association)

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Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

June 25, 2018

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

May 31, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association lists Five Healthy Habits may add more than a decade to life

May 22, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including eating a healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking, could prolong life expectancy at age 50 by 14 years for women and just over 12 years for men, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

America is one of the wealthiest countries worldwide, yet Americans have a shorter life expectancy compared with other high-income countries, including Japan, Canada and Norway.

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

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When Heart Disease runs in the Family, Exercise may be Best Defense

May 17, 2018

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXExercise may be the best way to keep hearts healthy – and it works even for people with a genetic pre-disposition for heart disease, according to new findings in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation.

Data assessed from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database showed that greater grip strength, more physical activity and better cardiorespiratory fitness are all associated with reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke, even among people with a genetic predisposition for heart disease.

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Genetic Test may improve Post-Stent Treatment, Outcome

May 11, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Using genetic testing to inform which blood thinner to use following a procedure to open narrowed blood vessels resulted in significantly fewer complications among patients, according to new research in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, an American Heart Association journal.

In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death, and stroke is the fifth-leading cause. A major contributor to these cardiovascular diseases is clogged blood vessels (atherosclerosis), which result from the buildup of fatty deposits or plaque.

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

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Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

April 29, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

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Hip Hop music teaches Children, Parents to recognize Stroke and act quickly

April 20, 2018

Stroke Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – An intervention that uses hip hop music with stroke education lyrics increased stroke awareness for economically-disadvantaged, minority children and their parents, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“The lack of stroke recognition, especially among blacks, results in dangerous delays in treatment,” said Olajide Williams, M.D., M.S., study author and associate professor of neurology at Columbia University Medical Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital. “Because of those delays, only a quarter of all stroke patients arrive at the hospital within the ideal time for clot-busting treatment.”  

The “Hip Hop Stroke” initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke. (American Heart Association)

The “Hip Hop Stroke” initiative uses hip hop music lyrics to effectively educate economically-disadvantaged, minority children and parents about stroke. (American Heart Association)

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Drinking Sugary Drinks may be associated with Greater Risk of Death

April 3, 2018

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Adults over the age of 45 who consume large amounts of sugary beverages including soft drinks, fruit drinks and fruit juices may have a higher risk of dying from heart disease or other causes, compared to those who drink fewer sugary drinks, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers found a graded association between consuming more sugary beverages and an increased risk of death from heart disease or any cause.

There was no increased risk of death from consumption of sugar-sweetened foods. (American Heart Association)

There was no increased risk of death from consumption of sugar-sweetened foods. (American Heart Association)

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