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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

June 25, 2018

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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High Protein Diet associated with small increased Heart Failure Risk in Middle-Aged Men

June 1, 2018

Circulation: Heart Failure Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk.

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

May 31, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Heart Defects in Infant may predict Heart Problems in Birth Mother later in life

May 10, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may have an increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study of more than one million women is the first to show congenital heart defects in newborns may be a marker for an increased risk of their mothers developing heart problems, including heart attack and heart failure, years after pregnancy.

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

April 29, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

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Survivors of Childhood Heart Defects may have higher risk of Premature Dementia

March 6, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People born with heart defects who survive into adulthood may be at higher risk of developing dementia, particularly dementia that starts before 65 years of age, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

With improved newborn and childhood treatments, more people born with heart defects survive into adulthood. A 2016 study published in Circulation estimated that approximately 1.4 million adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States.

Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects. (American Heart Association)

Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breast Cancer Treatments may increase the risk of Heart Disease

March 3, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and may benefit from a treatment approach that weighs the benefits of specific therapies against potential damage to the heart, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.

The statement is an overview of what we currently know about risk factors common to both heart disease and breast cancer, the potential heart damage from some breast cancer treatments, and suggested strategies to prevent or minimize the damage.

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

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Guideline Adherence, not Patient Volume, may be better Hospital Heart Failure Metric

February 26, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In evaluating the quality of care given to those hospitalized with heart failure, adherence to clinical guidelines may be a better measure of quality than the number of heart failure patients a hospital admits, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Patients with heart failure are unable to pump enough blood and oxygen to their bodies to remain healthy. According to the American Heart Association’s 2017 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update, 6.5 million Americans suffer from this chronic condition—and that number is growing.

Heart/Stroke Statistics. (American Heart Association)

Heart/Stroke Statistics. (American Heart Association)

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Neighborhood factors may predict Heart Failure

January 18, 2018

Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors in low-income areas may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual health factors and socioeconomic status, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study compared census tract data on socioeconomic deprivation – a clustering of neighborhood-level variables of wealth, education, occupation and housing patterns – and heart failure rates among 27,078 middle-aged whites and African-Americans from the Southeastern states.

Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. (American Heart Association)

Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. (American Heart Association)

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Middle-Aged Couch Potatoes may reverse Heart Effects of a Sedentary Life with Exercise Training

January 10, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their body used oxygen and had decreased cardiac stiffness after two years, both markers of a healthier heart.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

[Read more]

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