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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

December 23, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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American Heart Association reports Unmarried Heart Patients face higher risk of Death

December 22, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

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Catastrophic costs for hospitalization expenses common among uninsured heart and stroke patients

November 30, 2017

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – The majority of patients without health insurance who were hospitalized for heart attack, stroke or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery experienced catastrophic healthcare expenses before passage of the Affordable Care Act, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

For those who were uninsured, hospitalization expenses were catastrophic for 85 percent of heart attack patients, 75 percent of stroke patients and 80 percent of CABG patients. (American Heart Association)

For those who were uninsured, hospitalization expenses were catastrophic for 85 percent of heart attack patients, 75 percent of stroke patients and 80 percent of CABG patients. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

October 19, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

October 12, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Danish study finds One in Four People leave Work a year after a Heart Attack

October 10, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One in four people leave their job within a year of returning to work after having a heart attack, according to a newly published study from Denmark in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While previous studies have looked at return to work following heart attack, this study analyzed long-term employment. Despite a high number of heart attack patients returning to their jobs shortly after the event, the new findings reveal a surprisingly high degree of unemployment within a year after a heart attack patient returns to work.

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Quitting Daily Aspirin Therapy may increase second Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

October 5, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Stopping long-term, low-dose aspirin therapy may increase your risk of suffering a cardiovascular event, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Aspirin, taken in low doses, is used to help reduce the risk for recurrent heart attack or stroke. Aspirin inhibits clotting, lowering the risk of cardiovascular events. Nearly 10 to 20 percent of heart attack survivors stop daily aspirin use within the first three years following their event.

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

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Blood Pressure better controlled with “MAP” for Doctors

October 1, 2017

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Francisco, CA – A quality improvement program designed to better control hypertension in primary care practices notably improved hypertension control in six months, according to research presented today at the American Heart Association (AHA) Council on Hypertension, AHA Council on Kidney in Cardiovascular Disease, American Society of Hypertension Joint Scientific Sessions 2017, in San Francisco.

One in three American adults has high blood pressure. That number is steadily climbing, despite the fact that high blood pressure can be easily treated using evidence-based guidelines.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

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Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

September 16, 2017

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

In a study of more than two million Swedish siblings, researchers found that the risk of venous thromboembolism – a type of blood clot that starts in a vein – was associated with height, with the lowest risk being in shorter participants.

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

September 1, 2017

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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