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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

October 19, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

October 12, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Danish study finds One in Four People leave Work a year after a Heart Attack

October 10, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One in four people leave their job within a year of returning to work after having a heart attack, according to a newly published study from Denmark in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While previous studies have looked at return to work following heart attack, this study analyzed long-term employment. Despite a high number of heart attack patients returning to their jobs shortly after the event, the new findings reveal a surprisingly high degree of unemployment within a year after a heart attack patient returns to work.

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Black teens from Great Recession may have higher risk factors for heart disease, diabetes

September 20, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers studied 328 African-Americans who had experienced the Great Recession of 2007-2009 as 16- and 17-year-olds living in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccines are Not Just for Children

July 18, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Preventing an illness is always better than trying to treat it once it occurs. That’s why doctors with the Tennessee Department of Health encourage people of all ages to talk with their healthcare providers about the immunizations needed for lifelong protection.

“Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They provide protection against many potentially serious and preventable illnesses that can strike an individual, a family or a community without warning,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

[Read more]

Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

June 23, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Too little sleep may raise risk of death in people with cluster of Heart Disease risk factors

June 2, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes were approximately twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke as people without the same set of risk factors if they failed to get more than six hours of sleep, according to a new observational study published in the association’s open access publication Journal of the American Heart Association. For those who got more sleep, the risk of death was more modest.

The study, funded in part by the American Heart Association, is the first to measure sleep duration in the laboratory rather than rely on patient reports and the first to examine the impact of sleep duration on the risk of death in those with a common cluster of heart disease risk factors.

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

May 15, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Heart risks in Middle Age Boost Dementia Risk later in Life

March 4, 2017

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TX – People who have heart disease risks in middle age – such as diabetes, high blood pressure or smoking – are at higher risk for dementia later in life, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

“The health of your vascular system in midlife is really important to the health of your brain when you are older,” said Rebecca F. Gottesman, M.D., Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of neurology and epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in midle age increase dementia risk later in life. Dementia was: 41% higher in smokers; 39% higher in people with high blood pressure; 77% higher in people with diabetes. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Long-Term Heavy Drinking may Age Arteries over time

February 23, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Drinking too much, can affect the elasticity of the arterial walls (arterial stiffness) and prematurely age the arteries, interfering with blood flow.

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Heavy alcohol drinking habits over the years may prematurely age arteries, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease, compared to consistently moderate drinkers. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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