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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

American Heart Association says Young, Healthy People still vulnerable to Cardiovascular Disease if their LDL Cholesterol is high

September 9, 2018

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young, healthy people may still face a lifetime risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease if they cannot keep their cholesterol levels in check, according to new observational research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers in this latest study looked at associations between low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) thresholds and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality to evaluate whether people believed to be at low 10-year risk for heart health problems should begin pursuing efforts to lower elevated cholesterol earlier through lifestyle changes, and in some cases, cholesterol-lowering medication.

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

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Obesity in Young Women may set the stage for Heart Complications during and after Pregnancy

August 17, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Antonio, TX – Even in young women, obesity may potentially lead to heart complications during and after pregnancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in basic cardiovascular science.  

Obesity is a risk factor for preeclampsia, a type of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy and leaves women more prone to high blood pressure and heart disease later in life.  

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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Studying Heart Disease after Death can help the Living

July 11, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Autopsy is often an overlooked source of medical insight which may be hindering advances in cardiovascular medicine, according to new research published in a special issue of the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Autopsy is a source of discovery that informs the way we think about disease systemically,” said Jeffrey E. Saffitz, M.D., Ph.D., co-editor of the special issue and chair of the department of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston.”

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

Several papers in a special issue of Circulation offer insight into how autopsy contributes to answers about the causes of sudden cardiac death, information from implantable device to improve heart function, and identifying the original cause of atherosclerosis. (American Heart Association)

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Bariatric Surgery for Severely Obese Teens may help prevent Premature Heart Disease

April 29, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Bariatric surgery is predicted to cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teens with severe obesity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The researchers used a model based on research from the Framingham Heart Study that predicts the likelihood of heart disease events over a 30-year period.

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

For teens with severe obesity, the predicted 30-year risk of having a heart disease event, such as a heart attack or stroke, could be cut in half one year after bariatric surgery, according to a modeling study. (American Heart Association)

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Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

April 17, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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Grilling and other High-Temperature Cooking may raise risk of High Blood Pressure

April 16, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Grilled or well-done beef, chicken or fish may raise the risk of developing high blood pressure among people who regularly eat those foods, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Among people who routinely eat meat, chicken and fish, those who grill, broil or roast these foods at high temperatures may be more likely to develop high blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

Among people who routinely eat meat, chicken and fish, those who grill, broil or roast these foods at high temperatures may be more likely to develop high blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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Top Heart Disease and Stroke Research advances of 2017

March 5, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The Association, one of the top funders of heart- and stroke-related research worldwide, has been compiling an annual top 10 list of major advances in heart disease and stroke science since 1996. Here, in no particular order, are the organization’s picks for leading research accomplishments published in 2017.

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Stroke Association says a usually-ignored finding in the Kidneys may signal Stroke Risk

February 22, 2018

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Sacs of fluid in the kidneys may indicate there is also blood vessel damage in the brain and a heightened risk of stroke, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Heart disease is the Number 1 killer in the United States. (American Heart Association)

Heart disease is the Number 1 killer in the United States. (American Heart Association)

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Diabetes Prevention Begins With You

December 7, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – As the seventh leading cause of death in the United States, diabetes is the primary cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations and adult-onset blindness.

The Tennessee Department of Health encourages individuals to take the necessary steps to prevent this disease.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

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High blood pressure redefined for first time in 14 years: 130 is the new high

November 26, 2017

American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Guidelines

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – High blood pressure should be treated earlier with lifestyle changes and in some patients with medication – at 130/80 mm Hg rather than 140/90 – according to the first comprehensive new high blood pressure guidelines in more than a decade.

The guidelines are being published by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) for detection, prevention, management and treatment of high blood pressure.

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Chart. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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