Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes
Home - Set as Homepage - Add to Favorites - Contact Us
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee Photo Gallery and Video Gallery
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes Thursday - February 22, 2018  
Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus


 
Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Endothelial Cells may contribute to formation of new vessels compensating for inadequate Blood Supply

January 27, 2018

Circulation Research Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Cells that line the interior surface of blood vessels (endothelial cells) have the capacity to clonally expand and contribute to the development of new vessels due to inadequate blood supply to the heart, known as ischemia, according to a study in mice published in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Neighborhood factors may predict Heart Failure

January 18, 2018

Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors in low-income areas may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual health factors and socioeconomic status, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The study compared census tract data on socioeconomic deprivation – a clustering of neighborhood-level variables of wealth, education, occupation and housing patterns – and heart failure rates among 27,078 middle-aged whites and African-Americans from the Southeastern states.

Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. (American Heart Association)

Improvements in community resources such as exercise facilities, healthy food outlets and medical facilities could benefit residents. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Multi-Gene Test predicts early Heart Disease Risk

January 11, 2018

Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic risk score, predicted significantly more cases of early-onset heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine.

“Our results provide convincing evidence that the polygenic risk score could be added to the genetic investigation of patients with very early coronary artery disease,” said study lead author.

The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect. (American Heart Association)

The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Middle-Aged Couch Potatoes may reverse Heart Effects of a Sedentary Life with Exercise Training

January 10, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their body used oxygen and had decreased cardiac stiffness after two years, both markers of a healthier heart.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

December 23, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Unmarried Heart Patients face higher risk of Death

December 22, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Compared to married heart disease patients, being unmarried was associated with a higher risk of dying, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

This is the first study to show an association between marital status and death from any cause and heart disease-related death in a high-risk heart patient population. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Abuse and adversity in childhood linked to more cardiovascular risk in adulthood

December 19, 2017

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports More Cardiac Arrest Victims could Survive with Dispatcher CPR Instruction, Rescue Breaths for Children

November 10, 2017

American Heart Association Moves to Annual Guidelines Update, a First for the Organization

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More people will survive cardiac arrest if emergency medical dispatchers give chest compression-only CPR instructions over the phone and if infants and children receive chest compressions with rescue breaths, according to updated CPR guidelines published today by the American Heart Association (Association), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease.

The changes in the 2017 American Heart Association Focused Updates on Adult and Pediatric Basic Life Support and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Quality also re-emphasize the importance of bystanders starting immediate chest compressions if they see an adult collapse in a suspected cardiac arrest.

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

Man administers CPR to child in reenactment illustrating proper technique. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

More physical activity and higher intensity physical activity may significantly reduce risk of death in older women in the short term

November 8, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More physical activity and at higher intensities could lead to a big drop in the risk of death in older women from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers found the volume of light intensity physical activity or sedentary behavior was not associated with death rate. However, light intensity activity may be beneficial for other health outcomes not studied in this research.

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Teen Childbirth linked to increased risk for Heart Disease

November 7, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXWomen who became first-time mothers as teens were significantly more likely than older mothers to have greater risks for heart and blood vessel disease later in life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers found that women reporting a first birth before the age of 20 scored significantly higher on Framingham Risk Score — a measure commonly used to estimate the 10-year cardiovascular risk.

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

Women who become teen-age mothers may be significantly more likely to have greater risks for cardiovascular disease later in life than older mothers. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Next Page »

 
|Home|Articles|Movie Theatre|Photo Gallery|Weather|Contact Us|
 
 
©2008 Discover Paris TN, Paris TN Web Design and Hosting by Compu-Net Enterprises.