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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

High Protein Diet associated with small increased Heart Failure Risk in Middle-Aged Men

June 1, 2018

Circulation: Heart Failure Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein, according to new research in Circulation: Heart Failure, an American Heart Association journal.

Despite the popularity of high protein diets, there is little research about how diets high in protein might impact men’s heart failure risk.

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

For middle-aged men, eating higher amounts of protein was associated with a slightly elevated risk for heart failure than those who ate less protein. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

May 31, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association lists Five Healthy Habits may add more than a decade to life

May 22, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Maintaining a healthy lifestyle, including eating a healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking, could prolong life expectancy at age 50 by 14 years for women and just over 12 years for men, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

America is one of the wealthiest countries worldwide, yet Americans have a shorter life expectancy compared with other high-income countries, including Japan, Canada and Norway.

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

A new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. (American Heart Association)

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When Heart Disease runs in the Family, Exercise may be Best Defense

May 17, 2018

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXExercise may be the best way to keep hearts healthy – and it works even for people with a genetic pre-disposition for heart disease, according to new findings in the American Heart Association’s journal, Circulation.

Data assessed from roughly a half-million people in the UK Biobank database showed that greater grip strength, more physical activity and better cardiorespiratory fitness are all associated with reduced risk for heart attacks and stroke, even among people with a genetic predisposition for heart disease.

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

As fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Vegetarian and Mediterranean Diet may be equally effective in preventing Heart Disease

March 23, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes eggs and dairy but excludes meat and fish, and a Mediterranean diet are likely equally effective in reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Previous separate studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet reduces certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as does a vegetarian diet; however, this was the first study to compare effects of the two distinct eating patterns.

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

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Survivors of Childhood Heart Defects may have higher risk of Premature Dementia

March 6, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People born with heart defects who survive into adulthood may be at higher risk of developing dementia, particularly dementia that starts before 65 years of age, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

With improved newborn and childhood treatments, more people born with heart defects survive into adulthood. A 2016 study published in Circulation estimated that approximately 1.4 million adults are living with congenital heart defects in the United States.

Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects. (American Heart Association)

Children born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects. (American Heart Association)

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Top Heart Disease and Stroke Research advances of 2017

March 5, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New medicines to fight heart disease, updated guidelines for strokes and high blood pressure, and research into genome editing are among the top heart disease and stroke advances in 2017, according to the American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The Association, one of the top funders of heart- and stroke-related research worldwide, has been compiling an annual top 10 list of major advances in heart disease and stroke science since 1996. Here, in no particular order, are the organization’s picks for leading research accomplishments published in 2017.

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association identifies most impactful scientific discoveries for Heart Disease and Stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breast Cancer Treatments may increase the risk of Heart Disease

March 3, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and may benefit from a treatment approach that weighs the benefits of specific therapies against potential damage to the heart, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.

The statement is an overview of what we currently know about risk factors common to both heart disease and breast cancer, the potential heart damage from some breast cancer treatments, and suggested strategies to prevent or minimize the damage.

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

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Guideline Adherence, not Patient Volume, may be better Hospital Heart Failure Metric

February 26, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In evaluating the quality of care given to those hospitalized with heart failure, adherence to clinical guidelines may be a better measure of quality than the number of heart failure patients a hospital admits, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Patients with heart failure are unable to pump enough blood and oxygen to their bodies to remain healthy. According to the American Heart Association’s 2017 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistical Update, 6.5 million Americans suffer from this chronic condition—and that number is growing.

Heart/Stroke Statistics. (American Heart Association)

Heart/Stroke Statistics. (American Heart Association)

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Middle-Aged Couch Potatoes may reverse Heart Effects of a Sedentary Life with Exercise Training

January 10, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their body used oxygen and had decreased cardiac stiffness after two years, both markers of a healthier heart.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle.

[Read more]

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