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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

October 19, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Scientists think Public Opinion important before Human Gene Editing

October 8, 2017

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, according to a survey of scientists published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

“Early studies with human embryos have established the feasibility of human germline genome editing but raise complex social, ethical and legal questions,” said Kiran Musunuru, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, lead survey author and an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and genetics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, a survey of 300 cardiovascular researchers finds.

The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, a survey of 300 cardiovascular researchers finds.

[Read more]

Quitting Daily Aspirin Therapy may increase second Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

October 5, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Stopping long-term, low-dose aspirin therapy may increase your risk of suffering a cardiovascular event, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Aspirin, taken in low doses, is used to help reduce the risk for recurrent heart attack or stroke. Aspirin inhibits clotting, lowering the risk of cardiovascular events. Nearly 10 to 20 percent of heart attack survivors stop daily aspirin use within the first three years following their event.

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

September 16, 2017

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

In a study of more than two million Swedish siblings, researchers found that the risk of venous thromboembolism – a type of blood clot that starts in a vein – was associated with height, with the lowest risk being in shorter participants.

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Low-income patients more likely to take blood pressure medication when doctor involves them in conversation

August 29, 2017

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

August 17, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time Heart Attacks than Whites

July 11, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Black men may have similar risk of coronary heart disease as white men, but their first cardiac event is twice as likely to be fatal. That means preventing a first heart attack is even more crucial for blacks, according to research findings reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In an analysis that examined cardiac events in three major heart studies, researchers found that in two of these studies, black adults aged 45-64 have about twice the risk of fatal events compared with whites.

Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time heart attacks than whites [Read more]

Hospitalizations for Heart Failure on the decline; disparities remain for Blacks and Men

June 28, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The number of people hospitalized for heart failure in the United States declined about 30 percent between 2002 and 2013, but large disparities between blacks vs. whites and men vs. women remain, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart failure hospitalizations in the United States have declined overall but remain significantly higher among blacks. While still hospitalized more than whites, the disparity narrowed between Hispanics and whites. (American Heart Association)

Heart failure hospitalizations in the United States have declined overall but remain significantly higher among blacks. While still hospitalized more than whites, the disparity narrowed between Hispanics and whites. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Four-year follow-up confirms that participation in competitive sports may be okay for many athletes with implanted cardioverter defibrillators

June 10, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A four-year study of athletes with implantable defibrillators confirms an earlier short-term study’s findings that competitive sports may be considered for many of these athletes, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a battery-powered device placed under the skin that tracks the heart rate and delivers an electric shock when it detects a type of abnormal heart rhythm called an arrhythmia.

ICD patients should talk to their doctors about their individual risks of participating in competitive sports.

ICD patients should talk to their doctors about their individual risks of participating in competitive sports.

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Chronic Anabolic Steroid use may damage Heart, Arteries

June 1, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid use may reduce the heart’s ability to pump blood throughout the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In addition, long-term anabolic-androgenic steroid use damages the heart muscle’s ability to relax and may cause atherosclerotic coronary artery disease.

Anabolic-androgenic steroids mimic naturally occurring testosterone, a muscle-building hormone that promotes male sexual characteristics.

Hardening of the arteries is associated with long-term anabolic steroid use. (American Heart Association)

Hardening of the arteries is associated with long-term anabolic steroid use. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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