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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

American Heart Association says new WHO findings on physical activity alarming

September 17, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on the World Health Organization (WHO)’s findings of insufficient physical activity in the world’s adult population.

According to the study, 40 percent of adults in the United States do not get the recommended amount of physical activity.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

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American Heart Association says Young, Healthy People still vulnerable to Cardiovascular Disease if their LDL Cholesterol is high

September 9, 2018

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young, healthy people may still face a lifetime risk of premature death from cardiovascular disease if they cannot keep their cholesterol levels in check, according to new observational research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers in this latest study looked at associations between low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) thresholds and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality to evaluate whether people believed to be at low 10-year risk for heart health problems should begin pursuing efforts to lower elevated cholesterol earlier through lifestyle changes, and in some cases, cholesterol-lowering medication.

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

A study of more than 36,000 people followed for over two decades revealed that healthy individuals considered “low-risk” still died from cardiovascular disease if they had high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (Ameircan Heart Association)

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Older Adults who get physical can lower their Heart Disease Risk

September 2, 2018

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in light to vigorous physical activity, benefit with healthier levels of heart and vessel disease markers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The results from increased physical activity were found to be particularly good among women.

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

Adults in their early 60s, who spend less time sitting and more time engaged in physical activity have healthier levels of heart and vessel disease indicators. (American Heart Association)

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Poor air quality does not offset exercise’s heart benefits

August 11, 2018

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Even in areas with moderate-to-high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“While exercise is known to reduce cardiovascular disease risk; pollution can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks, asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease,” said Nadine Kubesch, Ph.D., lead author and researcher at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Even in areas with moderate to high levels of traffic pollution, regular physical activity reduced the risk of first and recurrent heart attack. (American Heart Association)

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Young Binge Drinkers may have Higher Heart Risks

July 14, 2018

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults who frequently binge drink were more likely to have certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease than non-binge drinkers, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“Compared to previous generations, the pervasiveness, intensity (number of drinks) and regularity (several times per week) of binge drinking may place today’s young adult at greater risk for more profound rates of alcohol-attributable harm,” said Mariann Piano, Ph.D., R.N., study lead author and Nancy and Hilliard Travis Chair in Nursing and Senior Associate Dean for Research at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in Nashville, Tennessee.

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

Young men who reported that they repeatedly binge drink had higher systolic blood pressure and total cholesterol while young women who repeatedly binge drink had higher blood sugar levels compared to non-binge drinkers. (American Heart Association)

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Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

June 25, 2018

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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Genomic Medicine may one day revolutionize Cardiovascular Care

June 20, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association summarizes the state-of-the-science of genomic medicine — the study of the health effects of the molecular interactions of a person’s unique genes — for studying cardiovascular traits and disorders and for therapeutic screening.

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people's health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

Genomic medicine could enable doctors to make predictions about people’s health, from the likelihood of developing heart disease or stroke to the severity of disease, as well as medications for treatment. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

May 31, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

May 25, 2018

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Genetic Test may improve Post-Stent Treatment, Outcome

May 11, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Using genetic testing to inform which blood thinner to use following a procedure to open narrowed blood vessels resulted in significantly fewer complications among patients, according to new research in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, an American Heart Association journal.

In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death, and stroke is the fifth-leading cause. A major contributor to these cardiovascular diseases is clogged blood vessels (atherosclerosis), which result from the buildup of fatty deposits or plaque.

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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