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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

American Heart Association says Keep saying Yes to Fish twice a week for Heart Health

May 31, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific advisory reaffirms the American Heart Association’s recommendation to eat fish- especially those rich in Omega-3 fatty acids twice a week to help reduce the risk of  heart failure, coronary heart disease, cardiac arrest and the most common type of stroke (ischemic). The advisory is published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

A new scientific advisory from the American Heart Association reaffirms the Association’s recommendation to eat two servings of fish per week. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says In-Womb Air Pollution Exposure associated with Higher Blood Pressure in Childhood

May 25, 2018

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children who were exposed to higher levels of air pollution during the third trimester of their mother’s pregnancy had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

Fine particulate matter of 2.5 microns or less (PM2.5) is a form of air pollution produced by motor vehicles and the burning of oil, coal and biomass, and has been shown to enter the circulatory system and negatively affect human health.

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

Children who were exposed to higher levels air pollution while in the womb had a higher risk of elevated blood pressure in childhood. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Genetic Test may improve Post-Stent Treatment, Outcome

May 11, 2018

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Using genetic testing to inform which blood thinner to use following a procedure to open narrowed blood vessels resulted in significantly fewer complications among patients, according to new research in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, an American Heart Association journal.

In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death, and stroke is the fifth-leading cause. A major contributor to these cardiovascular diseases is clogged blood vessels (atherosclerosis), which result from the buildup of fatty deposits or plaque.

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

A test for specific genetic mutations successfully informed blood-thinner treatment selection following stent placement to open clogged blood vessels, leading to significantly fewer complications. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Heart Defects in Infant may predict Heart Problems in Birth Mother later in life

May 10, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may have an increased risk of cardiovascular hospitalizations later in life, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

The study of more than one million women is the first to show congenital heart defects in newborns may be a marker for an increased risk of their mothers developing heart problems, including heart attack and heart failure, years after pregnancy.

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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Mono-unsaturated fats from plants, not animals may reduce risk of death from heart disease and other causes

April 19, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Diets rich in mono-unsaturated fatty acids from plants were associated with a lower risk of dying from heart disease or other causes compared to diets rich in mono-unsaturated fats from animals, which were linked to a higher risk of death from heart disease or other causes, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

The largest reductions in the risk of death were found when healthy fats from plant sources replaced saturated fats, trans fats and refined carbohydrates. (Amnerican Heart Association)

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Middle-aged Tooth loss linked to increased Coronary Heart Disease Risk

April 17, 2018

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Losing two or more teeth in middle age is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention | Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in population based cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

Having fewer natural teeth by middle age is linked to higher cardiovascular disease risk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Vegetarian and Mediterranean Diet may be equally effective in preventing Heart Disease

March 23, 2018

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, which includes eggs and dairy but excludes meat and fish, and a Mediterranean diet are likely equally effective in reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Previous separate studies have shown that a Mediterranean diet reduces certain risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as does a vegetarian diet; however, this was the first study to compare effects of the two distinct eating patterns.

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

Mediterranean Diet Foods: Vegetables, grains, and olive oil for a Mediterranean diet. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Breast Cancer Treatments may increase the risk of Heart Disease

March 3, 2018

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and may benefit from a treatment approach that weighs the benefits of specific therapies against potential damage to the heart, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.

The statement is an overview of what we currently know about risk factors common to both heart disease and breast cancer, the potential heart damage from some breast cancer treatments, and suggested strategies to prevent or minimize the damage.

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

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Abuse and adversity in childhood linked to more cardiovascular risk in adulthood

December 19, 2017

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children and teens who are abused, witness violence, are bullied or face other adversities are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases in adulthood, according to a new scientific statement by the American Heart Association published in the Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is based on a review of existing scientific research published in peer-reviewed medical journals that documents a strong association between adverse experiences in childhood and teen years and a greater likelihood of developing risk factors such as obesity, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes earlier than those not experiencing adverse experiences.

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

Children and teens who experience abuse, bullying, neglect or witness violence and other forms of adversity are more likely to develop heart and blood vessel diseases as adults. (American Heart Association)

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Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

December 5, 2017

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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