Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes
Home - Set as Homepage - Add to Favorites - Contact Us
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee
Discover Paris TN,  Henry County Tennessee Photo Gallery and Video Gallery
Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes Tuesday - August 22, 2017  
Yellow Pages -  Business Directory Plus


 
Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Quitting statins after stroke may raise risk of another stroke

August 8, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXStroke patients who stopped taking statin drugs three to six months after a first ischemic stroke, the type caused by narrowed arteries, had a higher risk of a having another stroke within a year, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers also found that discontinuing statin drugs, which lower cholesterol, between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke was linked to higher risk of death and hospitalization among the patients in the study.

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Government funds dwindle for cardiac arrest research

July 13, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to conduct cardiac arrest research has dwindled in the last decade and is a fraction of what the government spends to study other leading causes of death, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study authors cite Institute of Medicine statistics that suggest cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 450,000 lives each year.

NIH Research Funding Graphic. (American Heart Association) [Read more]

Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

June 23, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Heart Failure Patients readmitted to the same hospital may have better outcomes

May 27, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When patients with heart failure were re-hospitalized within a month, those who returned to the same hospital were discharged quicker and were more likely to survive, according to new Canadian research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In both Canada and the United States, ambulance policies usually require patients be taken to the nearest emergency room, even if a patient has recently been hospitalized somewhere else.

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

May 15, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

One in three American adults may have had a warning stroke, American Stroke Association survey finds

May 3, 2017

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in three American adults experienced a symptom consistent with a warning or “mini” stroke, but almost none – 3 percent – took the recommended action, according to a new survey from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

Thirty-five percent of respondents reported having experienced at least one sign of a warning stroke, called a transient ischemic attack or TIA. Those who did were more likely to wait, rest or take medicine than call 911, said the AHA/ASA, the nation’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Energy drinks linked to more heart, blood pressure changes than caffeinated drinks alone

April 27, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink resulted in more profound changes in the heart’s electrical activity and blood pressure than drinking 32 ounces of a control drink with the same amount of caffeine – 320 milligrams (mg), according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration generally considers caffeine in doses of less than 400 mg as safe, energy drinks often consist of not only caffeine but proprietary energy blends.

Two hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink.

Two hours after drinking 32 ounces of a commercially available energy drink, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a caffeine-matched control drink.

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Stem Cell Patch shows early promise in treating Heart Failure

April 13, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patching a damaged heart with a patient’s own muscle stem cells improves symptoms of heart failure, according to a Phase I clinical trial reported in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In this new study, Japanese researchers made patches out of cells taken from the thigh muscles of patients with heart failure and surgically glued the patch onto the surface of the patients’ hearts.

In a Phase I clinical trial, heart failure patients treated with patches made from their muscle cells showed improved exercise capacity and heart function after one year. (American Heart Association)

In a Phase I clinical trial, heart failure patients treated with patches made from their muscle cells showed improved exercise capacity and heart function after one year. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Gum Disease, Tooth Loss may increase Postmenopausal Women’s Risk of Death

April 1, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Gum disease and tooth loss may be associated with a higher risk of death in postmenopausal women but not increased cardiovascular disease risk, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Loss of all natural teeth also was linked with an increased risk of death in postmenopausal women.

Gum disease and tooth loss in postmenopausal women may be linked to a higher risk of death. (American Heart Association)

Gum disease and tooth loss in postmenopausal women may be linked to a higher risk of death. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says New Process designed to streamline faster care for EMS Triage, transport of Stroke Patients

March 30, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new process, developed by the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association, will help streamline the initial emergency care of stroke patients. 

The new Severity-based Stroke Triage Algorithm for emergency medical services (EMS) equips ambulance crews with information and tools to better identify a stroke, assess a patient’s overall condition and determine the best hospital for the patient’s specific treatment needs.

Getting the right treatment fast can help improve patient outcomes. (American Heart Association)

Getting the right treatment fast can help improve patient outcomes. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Next Page »

 
|Home|Articles|Movie Theatre|Photo Gallery|Weather|Contact Us|
 
 
©2008 Discover Paris TN, Paris TN Web Design and Hosting by Compu-Net Enterprises.