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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Men develop Irregular Heartbeat earlier than Women

October 19, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Men develop a type of irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation, about a decade earlier than women on average, and being overweight is a major risk factor, according to a large new study published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In atrial fibrillation, the upper chambers of the heart, or atria, quiver instead of beat to move blood effectively.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

The risk of developing the irregular rhythm known as atrial fibrillation rises with increasing age and weight.

[Read more]

CDC reports Adult and Teen Obesity Rates hit all-time high

October 14, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) indicate the adult obesity rates in the United States are now a staggering 40 percent while youth obesity rates grew to 20 percent for 12-to-19-year-olds.

An all-time high, these rates and the persistent disparities across different race-ethnicity groups further elevate public health concerns about how our nation can prevent and reduce obesity.

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

American Heart Association calls for transformative change to reverse trends in obesity. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Tai Chi holds promise as Cardiac Rehab Exercise

October 12, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation, according to preliminary research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

After a heart attack, more than 60 percent of patients decline participation in cardiac rehabilitation.

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

The slow and gentle movements of Tai Chi – which can increase in pace – hold promise as an alternative exercise option for patients who decline traditional cardiac rehabilitation. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association releases New Music Video to raise awareness of Stroke Warning Signs

October 11, 2017

American Stroke Association launches a Y.M.C.A parody song to educate about stroke

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, is releasing a new parody music video to teach people how to recognize the most common stroke warning signs.

Worldwide, stroke is the No. 2 cause of death and a leading cause of serious disability. For the American Stroke Association, raising awareness of stroke is more critical than ever, as new reports indicate that stroke deaths are on the rise.

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Danish study finds One in Four People leave Work a year after a Heart Attack

October 10, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One in four people leave their job within a year of returning to work after having a heart attack, according to a newly published study from Denmark in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While previous studies have looked at return to work following heart attack, this study analyzed long-term employment. Despite a high number of heart attack patients returning to their jobs shortly after the event, the new findings reveal a surprisingly high degree of unemployment within a year after a heart attack patient returns to work.

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

Heart attack survivors with diabetes, heart failure, depression and lower educational and income levels were the most likely to not be working a year after their heart attack. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Scientists think Public Opinion important before Human Gene Editing

October 8, 2017

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, according to a survey of scientists published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

“Early studies with human embryos have established the feasibility of human germline genome editing but raise complex social, ethical and legal questions,” said Kiran Musunuru, M.D., Ph.D., MPH, lead survey author and an associate professor of cardiovascular medicine and genetics at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, a survey of 300 cardiovascular researchers finds.

The public should be consulted before gene editing is used to treat human embryos, a survey of 300 cardiovascular researchers finds.

[Read more]

Queen Latifah asks America, “What The HF?” to raise awareness about signs, symptoms of heart failure

October 7, 2017

Learn how to recognize and manage HF, a dangerous, chronic condition affecting more than 6.5 million Americans

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Heart failure (HF) kills thousands of people each year. But, the chronic, progressive condition can be managed if it’s diagnosed and treated early.

The American Heart Association (AHA), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, is making it easy for people to test their heart failure knowledge while learning how to recognize the signs and symptoms of HF through a new interactive quiz that asks, “What The HF?”

Queen Latifah. (American Heart Association)

Queen Latifah. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Umbilical Cord Stem Cells show promise as Heart Failure Treatment

October 6, 2017

Circulation Research Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A heart failure treatment using umbilical cord-derived stem cells may lead to notable improvements in heart muscle function and quality of life, according to a new study published in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal.

“We are encouraged by our findings because they could pave the way to a non-invasive, promising new therapy for a group of patients who face grim odds,” said study corresponding author Fernando Figueroa, M.D., professor of medicine at the Universidad de los Andes in Chile.

Intravenous stem cell infusion derived from umbilical cords appears to boost heart muscle function in patients with heart failure, according to a small study. (American Heart Association)

Intravenous stem cell infusion derived from umbilical cords appears to boost heart muscle function in patients with heart failure, according to a small study. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Quitting Daily Aspirin Therapy may increase second Heart Attack, Stroke Risk

October 5, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Stopping long-term, low-dose aspirin therapy may increase your risk of suffering a cardiovascular event, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Aspirin, taken in low doses, is used to help reduce the risk for recurrent heart attack or stroke. Aspirin inhibits clotting, lowering the risk of cardiovascular events. Nearly 10 to 20 percent of heart attack survivors stop daily aspirin use within the first three years following their event.

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

Risk increases shortly after stopping aspirin therapy and does not appear to diminish over time. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says One E-Cigarette may lead to Adrenaline changes in Nonsmokers’ Hearts

October 3, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Healthy nonsmokers may experience increased adrenaline levels in their heart after one electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) with nicotine, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Nerve endings in the sympathetic nervous system release both adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenalin (norepinephrine), both of which play a role in the fight or flight response. Perpetually increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system contributes to increased cardiac risk.

Healthy nonsmokers experienced increased adrenaline levels in their heart after one electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) with nicotine. (American Heart Association)

Healthy nonsmokers experienced increased adrenaline levels in their heart after one electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) with nicotine. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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