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Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes Thursday - September 21, 2017  
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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Black teens from Great Recession may have higher risk factors for heart disease, diabetes

September 20, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African-American teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers studied 328 African-Americans who had experienced the Great Recession of 2007-2009 as 16- and 17-year-olds living in nine rural counties in Georgia with high poverty rates and high rates of death from cardiovascular disease.

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

Black teens who lived through the Great Recession of 2007-2009 may have higher risk of metabolic syndrome, a cluster of several heart disease and diabetes risk factors. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Tennessee Department of Health reports Increasing Number of Tennesseans Dying from Drug Overdoses

September 19, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Tennessee Department of Health data show 1,631 Tennesseans died from drug overdoses in 2016, the highest annual number of such deaths recorded in state history. This is an increase from the 1,451 overdose deaths recorded among Tennessee residents in 2015.

“Each of these numbers represents a person, with family and friends who are now facing the loss of someone dear to them to a cause that is preventable,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

2012-16 Drug Overdose Deaths in Tennessee [Read more]

Can height increase risk for blood clots in veins?

September 16, 2017

Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The taller you are, the more likely you may be to develop blood clots in the veins, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics.

In a study of more than two million Swedish siblings, researchers found that the risk of venous thromboembolism – a type of blood clot that starts in a vein – was associated with height, with the lowest risk being in shorter participants.

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

Risk of blood clots in the veins was associated with height, with the lowest risk in participants who were five feet tall or shorter. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Simple Steps Protect You from Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

September 9, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health has now confirmed 19 human cases of West Nile Virus infection and 11 cases of La Crosse Virus infection in the state so far in 2017.

Mosquito-borne illness is more common during late summer and TDH recommends taking simple steps to avoid mosquito bites and help prevent mosquito-borne illnesses.

Cases of West Nile Virus, La Crosse Encephalitis increasing in Tennessee

Cases of West Nile Virus, La Crosse Encephalitis increasing in Tennessee

[Read more]

Protect Yourself, Your Family Against Measles

September 5, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health urges parents and other caregivers to make sure all children are vaccinated against measles.

While measles was declared eradicated in the U.S. in 2000 thanks to widespread vaccination, outbreaks have occurred in recent years in pockets of unvaccinated people in communities across the country.

U.S. Outbreaks Remind of Importance of Vaccination.

U.S. Outbreaks Remind of Importance of Vaccination.

[Read more]

Young adults, especially men, fall behind in high blood pressure treatment and control

September 1, 2017

Hypertension Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young adults, particularly men, lag behind middle-aged and older adults in awareness and treatment of high blood pressure, putting this population at an increased risk for heart attack and stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

High blood pressure is a leading risk factor for heart attack and stroke and is also a significant public health burden, costing the United States about $110 billion in direct and indirect costs in 2015, according to American Heart Association estimates.

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

Awareness, treatment and control of high blood pressure is significantly lower in young adults compared to middle-aged and older adults. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

August 31, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Low-income patients more likely to take blood pressure medication when doctor involves them in conversation

August 29, 2017

Circulation: Quality and Outcomes Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The key to getting low-income patients to take their blood pressure medications as prescribed may be as simple as a conversation.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure were less likely to take their medications as directed when their healthcare providers did not use a collaborative communication style or ask them about social issues such as employment, housing and partner relationships, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Quality and Outcomes.

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

Low-income patients with high blood pressure whose healthcare providers did not use collaborative communication styles or ask about social issues, such as employment and housing, were less likely to take their blood pressure medications as directed. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association reports Air pollution linked to Cardiovascular Disease; Air Purifiers may lessen impact

August 28, 2017

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Exposure to high levels of air pollution increased stress hormone levels and negative metabolic changes in otherwise healthy, young adults in a recent study conducted in China. Air purifiers appeared to lessen the negative effects, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers focused on fine particulate matter (PM2.5) – a component of air pollution emitted from vehicles, factories, power plants, fires and smoking – because many studies have suggested this type of major air pollutant might lead to cardiovascular and metabolic health consequences, according to Haidong Kan, M.D., Ph.D., study author and professor of environmental health sciences at Fudan University in Shanghai, China.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

Negative effects of pollution exposure decreased after using indoor air purifiers over a 9-day period.

[Read more]

Disadvantaged Kids may be at higher risk for Heart Disease later in life

August 25, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in adults may indicate higher risk for heart attack and stroke in later life, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The carotid arteries supply blood to the brain. An ultrasound test of the arteries’ inner layers, the intima and media, may detect the early development of atherosclerosis, or “hardening of the arteries,” which underlies the development of cardiovascular disease later in life.

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

Children from socially and economically disadvantaged families and neighborhoods appear more likely to have thicker carotid artery walls, which in middle-aged and older adults has been associated with higher risk for heart attack and stroke. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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