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Detailed Weather Reports, Event Calendar and Movie Showtimes Saturday - May 27, 2017  
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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Heart Failure Patients readmitted to the same hospital may have better outcomes

May 27, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When patients with heart failure were re-hospitalized within a month, those who returned to the same hospital were discharged quicker and were more likely to survive, according to new Canadian research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In both Canada and the United States, ambulance policies usually require patients be taken to the nearest emergency room, even if a patient has recently been hospitalized somewhere else.

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Tennessee Department of Health says Tick and Mosquito Season is here

May 21, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Ticks and mosquitoes are now out in force and looking for food. The meal of choice for both is blood, creating opportunities to spread a variety of serious illnesses such as Zika Virus Disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever as they move from one bite victim to another.

“For many people, a bite from a mosquito or tick won’t cause much more than an itchy, irritating spot on the skin or sometimes mild, flu-like symptoms,” said Tennessee Department of Health Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Fight the Bite to Prevent Spread of Serious Illnesses

Fight the Bite to Prevent Spread of Serious Illnesses

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Kicking the Salt Shaker habit may not be enough

May 18, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt.

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Nearly 1 in 5 with highest cardiac risk don’t think they need to improve health according to American Heart Association

May 15, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly one in five people who reported the greatest number of cardiac risk factors did not believe they needed to improve their health, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

While most people in the study at the highest risk for a heart attack were more likely to agree on needed health improvements, more than half of those perceiving this need identified barriers to change, which were most commonly lack of self-discipline, work schedule and family responsibilities.

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

A Canadian study found that nearly one in five of those at highest risk for a heart attack did not believe they needed to improve their health. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Golden Years are longer and healthier for those with Good Heart Health in Middle Age

May 11, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with no major heart disease risk factors in middle age live longer and stay healthy far longer than others, according to a 40-year study reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Good cardiovascular health in middle age delays the onset of many types of disease so that people live longer and spend a much smaller proportion of their lives with chronic illness,” said Norrina Allen, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

A Healthy Heart in Middle Age Could Add Almost Four Years to Your Life After Age 65 and Save You $18,000 in Medicare Care Costs. Graphic shows these benefits for middle aged adults who don't smoke or have diabetes, maintain a normal weight, have good blood pressure and good cholesterol. (American Heart Association) [Read more]

One in three American adults may have had a warning stroke, American Stroke Association survey finds

May 3, 2017

American Stroke Association - American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – About one in three American adults experienced a symptom consistent with a warning or “mini” stroke, but almost none – 3 percent – took the recommended action, according to a new survey from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

Thirty-five percent of respondents reported having experienced at least one sign of a warning stroke, called a transient ischemic attack or TIA. Those who did were more likely to wait, rest or take medicine than call 911, said the AHA/ASA, the nation’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular diseases and stroke.

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

F.A.S.T. infographic with stroke warning signs: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 9-1-1. Strokeassociation.org (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Tennessee issues Public Health Advisory on Fentanyl

April 30, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Fentanyl, an exceptionally powerful drug used legally to treat extreme pain, has found its way to the illegal drug market, and it is killing people.

According to three departments and one agency of Tennessee State Government, overdose deaths associated with fentanyl are increasing in the state and law enforcement officials have found the drug in counterfeit versions of commonly misused pain relief pills.

Misuse and Accidental Use of Powerful Drug Fentanyul can be Fatal.

Misuse and Accidental Use of Powerful Drug Fentanyul can be Fatal.

[Read more]

Diet Drinks and possible association with Stroke and Dementia

April 26, 2017

American Heart Association Stroke Journal Report

Current Science Suggests need for more Research

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Drinking at least one artificially sweetened beverage daily was associated with almost three times the risk of developing stroke or dementia compared to those who drank artificially-sweetened beverages less than once a week, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The authors caution that the long-term observational study was not designed or able to prove cause and effect, and only shows a trend among one group of people.

Framingham study participants who reported drinking one or more artificially sweetened beverage daily compared to less than one a week had almost three times the risk of developing either stroke or dementia.

Framingham study participants who reported drinking one or more artificially sweetened beverage daily compared to less than one a week had almost three times the risk of developing either stroke or dementia.

[Read more]

Economic and Health Impact of Sugary Drink Taxes

April 25, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO, comments on evaluation of sugary drink taxes in Berkeley, California published in the PLOS Medicine.

“This study adds to the compelling evidence that simply cannot be ignored.  The residents of Berkeley, who voted for a sugary drink tax in their community, are now seeing the benefits of significantly reduced consumption of sugary drinks, significantly increased consumption of water and consumers are switching to healthier drinks.”

Increasing Evidence for Taxing Sugary Drinks to Improve Heart Health “These early encouraging results affirm what we had believed -- the tax motivated people to drink fewer sugary drinks and more water in the first year.” Nancy Brown, American Heart Association CEO comments on increasing evidence for taxing sugary drinks to improve heart health. (American Heart Association) [Read more]

Can unemployment increase stroke risk?

April 18, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Unemployment appears to increase the risk of having a stroke in middle-age Japanese men and women, and may have similar implications in the U.S, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Unlike in the United States, in Japan, workers are part of a “life-term employment system” in which male employees devote themselves to a stable job. “If they lose that job, they are likely to be reemployed in unsatisfactory, lower positions,” said Ehab. S. Eshak, M.D., MSc., Ph.D., lead study author and visiting associate professor at Osaka University’s medical school in Japan.

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

While the Japanese work culture is different from the U.S. culture, researchers say the implication is that job security could help reduce stroke risk. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

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