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Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Articles

Information Articles for the Paris TN and Henry County Tennessee area

Leading Health Organizations Seek to Intervene in Defense of FDA Rule on E-Cigarettes, Cigars

July 25, 2017

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – Six leading public health organizations today asked federal courts to allow them to intervene in two lawsuits brought by the electronic cigarette and cigar industries against the Food and Drug Administration’s 2016 rule establishing public health oversight of e-cigarettes, cigars and other previously unregulated tobacco products.

The groups expressed concern that the Trump Administration may not adequately defend the rule (known as the “deeming rule”) or may seek to weaken or rescind it, putting the health of children and the public at risk.

Groups Express Concern Administration May Not Adequately Defend Essential Public Health Regulations Against Industry Challenges.

Groups Express Concern Administration May Not Adequately Defend Essential Public Health Regulations Against Industry Challenges.

[Read more]

Tennessee Department of Health says Vaccines are Not Just for Children

July 18, 2017

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Preventing an illness is always better than trying to treat it once it occurs. That’s why doctors with the Tennessee Department of Health encourage people of all ages to talk with their healthcare providers about the immunizations needed for lifelong protection.

“Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They provide protection against many potentially serious and preventable illnesses that can strike an individual, a family or a community without warning,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

Immunizations Prevent Serious Illnesses throughout Life.

[Read more]

American Heart Association says Government funds dwindle for cardiac arrest research

July 13, 2017

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to conduct cardiac arrest research has dwindled in the last decade and is a fraction of what the government spends to study other leading causes of death, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Study authors cite Institute of Medicine statistics that suggest cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death in the United States, claiming more than 450,000 lives each year.

NIH Research Funding Graphic. (American Heart Association) [Read more]

Stent coated with an Erectile Dysfunction Drug may help prevent Blood Clots and Artery Narrowing

July 12, 2017

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland OR – A stent coated with an erectile dysfunction drug may someday help prevent arteries from becoming narrow or blocked again, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences 2017 Scientific Sessions.

Stents help keep coronary arteries open and reduce the chance of a heart attack. With traditionally used bare metal stents, excessive tissue growth within the treated portion of the artery can cause restenosis — the artery to become narrow or blocked again.

If confirmed in human trials, the drug might someday be included in the coating of stents or given orally just after a stent is inserted to open a narrowed artery. (American Heart Association)

If confirmed in human trials, the drug might someday be included in the coating of stents or given orally just after a stent is inserted to open a narrowed artery. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time Heart Attacks than Whites

July 11, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Black men may have similar risk of coronary heart disease as white men, but their first cardiac event is twice as likely to be fatal. That means preventing a first heart attack is even more crucial for blacks, according to research findings reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

In an analysis that examined cardiac events in three major heart studies, researchers found that in two of these studies, black adults aged 45-64 have about twice the risk of fatal events compared with whites.

Blacks suffer higher rates of fatal first-time heart attacks than whites [Read more]

American Heart Association says Renewed Trend in Movie Tobacco Scenes Disturbing

July 8, 2017

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments today on a new study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on “Tobacco Use in Top-Grossing Movies — United States, 2010–2016:”

“Based on previous trends, we thought tobacco use in film would soon play its final scene. This latest CDC study indicates a troublesome plot twist.

The Surgeon General has concluded that there is a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in the movies and the initiation of smoking among young persons.

The Surgeon General has concluded that there is a causal relationship between depictions of smoking in the movies and the initiation of smoking among young persons.

[Read more]

CDC reports Opioid prescribing is still high, varies widely throughout the United States

July 6, 2017

Centers for Disease Control and PreventionWashington, D.C. – The amount of opioids prescribed in the United States peaked in 2010 and then decreased each year through 2015, but remains at high levels and varies from county to county in the U.S., according to the latest Vital Signs report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In 2015 six times more opioids per resident were dispensed in the highest-prescribing counties than in the lowest-prescribing counties. This wide variation suggests inconsistent prescribing practices among healthcare providers and that patients receive different care depending on where they live.

Graphic shows a map of the US. Counties in the US vary regarding the amount of opioids prescribed per person. The amount of opioids prescribed per person varied widely among counties in 2015. [Read more]

Hospitalizations for Heart Failure on the decline; disparities remain for Blacks and Men

June 28, 2017

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The number of people hospitalized for heart failure in the United States declined about 30 percent between 2002 and 2013, but large disparities between blacks vs. whites and men vs. women remain, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart failure hospitalizations in the United States have declined overall but remain significantly higher among blacks. While still hospitalized more than whites, the disparity narrowed between Hispanics and whites. (American Heart Association)

Heart failure hospitalizations in the United States have declined overall but remain significantly higher among blacks. While still hospitalized more than whites, the disparity narrowed between Hispanics and whites. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

June 27, 2017

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

[Read more]

In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

June 24, 2017

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

[Read more]

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